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Labor and Leisure in the City, the Country, and the Seashore: the Wood Engravings of Winslow Homer. Selections from the Permanent Collection of the Duke University Museum of Art

Labor and Leisure in the City, the Country, and at the Seashore: the Wood Engravings of Winslow Homer; Selections from the Permanent Collection of the Duke University Museum of Art
November 11-January 30, 1995
Winslow Homer (1836-1910) is perhaps best known for his oils and watercolors of the sea. However, from 1857 to 1888, Homer illustrated books and articles for several magazines, including Appleton¹s Journal, Our Young Folks, and especially Harper¹s Weekly, which sent him to the front during the Civil War. Homer¹s realistic depictions of everyday life were extremely popular as the magazines brought his work into households across the United States. The engravings explore many themes, often paralleled in his paintings, including the Civil War, the outdoors, recreational activities, the sea, women in society, African-Americans during both the Civil War and the Reconstruction, and childhood.
The theme and specific works in the exhibition were chosen by first-year Duke University students, under the supervision of curator Dr. Jill Meredith and Ms. Robin Gibson, curatorial assistant. The Duke-Semans Fine Arts Foundation provided support for the project which included an accompanying brochure with text written by the Duke students, and which also allowed the exhibition to travel to other venues in the state. A Homer wood engraving from Guilford College¹s collection was featured through the duration of the exhibition at Guilford College.